We’re Looking for a Tax Manager

We’re Looking for a Tax Manager

Job Post: Tax Manager, Douglasville, GA

About the Job:

We seek a talented Tax Manager with a minimum of 3 years of experience in a public CPA firm to join our team at Hawkinson Muchnick & Associates, PC. As a Tax Manager, you will play a crucial role in providing exceptional tax services to our business and individual clients. This position offers growth opportunities, including the possibility of ownership, and promotes work-life balance.

Responsibilities:

  • Provide comprehensive tax planning and compliance services for a diverse client base.
  • Manage and review tax returns, ensuring accuracy and adherence to relevant regulations.
  • Conduct tax research and stay up-to-date with changing tax laws and regulations.
  • Develop and maintain strong client relationships, delivering exceptional customer service.
  • Identify tax planning opportunities and provide strategic advice to clients.
  • Supervise and mentor junior team members, fostering their professional growth.

Requirements:

  • Minimum of 3 years of experience in a public CPA firm, specializing in tax services.
  • Strong knowledge of tax laws, regulations, and compliance.
  • CPA certification is required
  • Excellent analytical, problem-solving, and organizational skills.
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team in a fast-paced environment.
  • Exceptional client relationship management skills.
  • Working knowledge of UltraTax is preferred

About the Company:

Hawkinson Muchnick & Associates, PC is a leading CPA firm based in Douglasville, GA. With over 30 years of professional experience and deep roots in the Douglas County area, we are known for our stability, expertise, and commitment to our clients. Our team of seasoned Certified Public Accountants and Enrolled Agent ensures that our clients receive top-notch financial planning services.

More than just a traditional tax and accounting firm, our comprehensive and customized strategic Financial Planning packages set us apart, allowing us to provide personalized solutions tailored to each client’s unique needs. As active members of the community, we actively participate in local organizations and take on leadership roles to make a positive impact.

How to Apply:

If you are a dedicated Tax Manager seeking a rewarding opportunity with growth potential, we would love to hear from you. Please submit your resume and a cover letter detailing your relevant experience and why you would be a great fit for our team preferably via LInkedIn Job Post or via this website via the contact form. Let’s start a conversation about your future with Hawkinson Muchnick & Associates!

Note: All applications will be treated confidentially. Only qualified candidates will be contacted for further steps in the hiring process.

About Us: https://hma-cpa.com

Location: Douglasville, GA

Employment Type: Full-time

Salary: Competitive, based on experience

We look forward to reviewing your application and exploring the possibility of welcoming you to our team at Hawkinson Muchnick & Associates, PC.

Watch Out For These Unexpected Tax Surprises!

Watch Out For These Unexpected Tax Surprises!

No one likes surprises from the IRS, but they do occasionally happen. Here are some examples of tax situations you could find yourself in and what to do about them.

  • Kids getting older tax surprise. Your children are a wonderful tax deduction if they meet certain qualifications. But as they get older, many child-related deductions fall off and create an unexpected tax bill. And it doesn’t happen all at once.
    As an example, one of the largest tax deductions your children can provide you is via the child tax credit. If they are under age 17 on December 31st and meet several other qualifications, you could get up to $2,000 for that child on that year’s tax return. But you’ll lose this deduction the year they turn 17. If their 17th birthday occurs in 2023, you can’t claim them for the child tax credit when you file your 2023 tax return in 2024, resulting in $2,000 more in taxes you’ll need to pay.
  • Limited losses tax surprise. If you sell stock, cryptocurrency or any other asset at a loss of $5,000, for example, you can match this up with another asset you sell at a $5,000 gain and – presto! You won’t have to pay taxes on that $5,000 gain because the $5,000 loss cancels it out. But what if you don’t have another asset that you sold at a gain? In this example, the most you can deduct on your tax return is $3,000 (the remaining loss can be carried forward to subsequent years).
    Herein lies the tax surprise. If you have more than $3,000 in losses from selling assets, and you don’t have a corresponding amount of gains from selling assets, you’re limited to the $3,000 loss. So if you have a big loss from selling an asset in 2023, and no large gains from selling other assets to use as an offset, you can only deduct $3,000 of your loss on your 2023 tax return.
  • Getting a letter from the IRS surprise. Official tax forms such as W-2s and 1099s are mailed to both you and the IRS. If the figures on your income tax return do not match those in the hands of the IRS, you will get a letter from the IRS saying that you’re being audited. These audits are now done by mail and are commonly known as correspondence audits.
    Assuming you already know you received all your 1099s and W-2s and confirmed their accuracy, verify the information in the IRS letter with your records. Believe it or not, the IRS sometimes makes mistakes! It is always best to ask for help in how to correspond and make your payments in a timely fashion, if they are justified.

Please call to schedule a tax planning session so you can be prepared to navigate around any potential tax surprises you may encounter on your 2023 tax return.

Spend Less with These 5 Money Tips

Spend Less with These 5 Money Tips

Government data shows that record inflation from the last few years started to slow down throughout 2023, but much of the damage has already been done. Every bill we pay and purchase we make costs more now, from insurance to clothing, and groceries to household supplies. Here are some tips to spend less to help offset the effect from these now permanently higher prices.

  • Pay down high-interest debt. You can start spending less money today by paying down high-interest debt. Data from the Federal Reserve shows people who don’t pay off their credit card balance each month pay an average interest rate of 22.16%. For a monthly credit card payment of $75, this interest expense costs you $17 a month, or just over $200 a year.
  • Revisit your subscriptions. Write down how many monthly subscriptions you’re paying for, then add up the monthly cost. Then ask yourself the following questions: Can you do without some of these subscriptions? Can you cut the cost of some of these subscriptions? Are there some with overlapping benefits? Maybe you’ll discover a subscription you completely forgot about. You don’t have to cancel all of them, but getting rid of just a few can help you spend less each month.
  • Shop around for insurance. Loyalty to an insurance company doesn’t always pay off. Consider shopping around and comparing rates for homeowners’, auto, & umbrella insurance, along with other insurance coverage you may have.
  • Eat at home. Limit how often you dine out or stop for take-out. Your wallet will thank you! According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, overall food spending was up 12.7% in 2022, partly driven by a 20% increase in food spending away from home.
  • Start using a budget. Finally, spend less by creating a written monthly budget and sticking to it. Find a budgeting app that you like the look and feel of, then create a budget within that app to help you decide how much to spend each month in various categories. Once the budget has been created, be sure to keep it updated throughout the month, instead of waiting until the last week to get it up-to-date.

The cost of everything may have skyrocketed, but you still have at least some control over where your money goes each month. Consider these steps to cut your spending, and you may be surprised at how much you save.

The Power of Cultivating Gratitude

The Power of Cultivating Gratitude

It costs nothing to say thank you. Yet cultivating gratitude in your life may be one of the most rewarding moves you can make. Not only does it invoke warm fuzzies in everyone involved, expressing your appreciation may actually improve your health and well-being.

A landmark study by gratitude researcher Robert A. Emmons has shown that gratitude can reduce physical illness symptoms and toxic emotions. It can even help you sleep better and longer, according to a study published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being.

So what are some ways you can make gratitude part of your everyday life? Here are a few suggestions to help you get started:

  • Write it out. Write out what you’re thankful for in your life. This may mean making a nightly habit of writing in a journal or jotting down a message to a loved one and giving it to them. You could also make some sticky note reminders of what you’re grateful for and hang them on your mirror to read each morning.
  • Share a good memory. Reminiscing often stirs up feelings of gratitude. For instance, think about the time you first met a close friend in grade school. Contact them and tell them how grateful you are that it happened. Send a photo of that family vacation when you all shared a common experience like learning to water ski. When you think about it, you will quickly discover happy memories to share with loved ones.
  • Offer your service. Show your gratitude through your actions. If you appreciate your community, join a group to clean up the park and streets. Provide a positive online review for your favorite local café. Or volunteer at a Veterans Affairs hospital.
  • Lend an ear. Some of the most meaningful moments involve simply being heard. Return the favor. If your sister is usually the one who lets you ramble on about work grievances and family drama, it’s time to give her a turn. Let her know you’re there and ready to listen. Maybe you avoid your chatty (albeit helpful) coworker. When you see them next, give them 5 minutes of your time.
  • Pay it forward. Did your neighbor share a gutter-cleaning hack with you? Next time you see someone on your street cleaning their gutters, offer to lend a hand. See a mom digging for spare change at a check out register? Pay it for her. Let the appreciation of your good deed change someone else’s outlook for the day. When they offer to pay you back, just tell them to pay it forward.

There are opportunities to cultivate gratitude all around us. Refocusing on what you appreciate on regular basis can help you live a healthier, more satisfying life.

2024 Social Security Changes

2024 Social Security Changes

2024 Social Security
Find out how your benefits have changed

Average Retirement Benefits
Starting January 2024

Average Benefits – All Workers

  • 2024: $1,907/mo (+$80)
  • 2023: $1,827/mo

Maximum Benefits for Workers Retiring at Full Retirement Age

  • 2024: $3,822/mo (+$195)
  • 2023: $3,627/mo

An 3.2% cost of living increase for Social Security retirement benefits and SSI payments begins with December 2023 benefits (payable in January 2024).

Increase your Social Security retirement benefits by 5-8% per year when you delay applying until you’re age 70.

Social Security Revenues & Expenditures

Revenue Sources = $1.22 trillion

  • 3.9% – Taxation of benefits
  • 5.4% – Interest
  • 90.7% – Payroll taxes

Expenditures = $1.24 trillion

  • 0.6% – Administrative expenses
  • 0.4% – Railroad Retirement financial interchange
  • 99.0% – Benefit payments

SOURCE: 2023 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance Trust Funds, Table II.B1.

2024 Social Security & Medicare Tax Rates

If you work for someone else, your employer pays 7.65%

If you work for someone else, you pay 7.65%

If you’re self-employed, you pay 15.3%

NOTE: The above tax rates are a combination of 6.2% for Social Security and 1.45% for Medicare. There is also a 0.9% Medicare wages surtax for those with wages above $200,000 single ($250,000 joint filers) that is not reflected in these figures.

Item20242023Change
Maximum amount you may pay in Social Security taxes$10,453.20$9,932.40+$520.80
Maximum earnings amount Social Security will tax at 6.2%$168,600.00$160,200.00+$8,400.00
  • 182+ million people work and pay Social Security taxes
  • Social Security has provided financial protection for Americans since 1935

Social Security Payments Explained

  • Social Security (SS) retirement benefits are for people who have paid into the Social Security system through taxable income.
  • Social Security Disability (SSD or SSDI) benefits are for people who have disabilities but have paid into the Social Security the system through taxable income.
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits are for adults and children who have disabilities, plus limited income and resources.

Maximum SSI Payments

Filing Status20242023Change
Individual$943/mo$914/mo+ $29
Couple$1,415/mo$1,371/mo+ $44

How does Social Security work?

  • When you work, you pay taxes into Social Security.
  • The Social Security Administration uses your tax money to pay benefits to people right now.
  • Any unused money goes into Social Security trust funds and is borrowed by the government to pay for other programs.
  • Later on when you retire, you receive benefits.

How to qualify for retirement benefits

When you work and pay Social Security taxes, you earn credits toward benefits. The number of credits you need to earn retirement benefits depends on when you were born.

  • If you were born in 1929 or later, you need 40 credits (10 years of work) to receive retirement benefits
  • You receive one credit for each $1,730 of earnings in 2024
  • 4 credits maximum per year

Did you know you can check your benefits status before you retire?

  • You can check online by creating a my Social Security account on the SSA website. If you don’t have an account, you’ll be mailed a paper Social Security statement 3 months before your 61st birthday.
  • It shows your year-by-year earnings, and estimates of retirement, survivors and disability benefits you and your family may be able to receive now and in the future.
  • If it doesn’t show earnings from a state or local government employer, contact them. The work may not be covered within Social Security.

Sources: SSA.gov

Take a Look at Better Savings Rates

Take a Look at Better Savings Rates

A silver lining to continued interest rate hikes by the Federal Reserve is being able to earn more interest on cash stashed in your savings accounts. How much interest, exactly, you can earn depends on where you do your banking. Consider these tips to earn as much interest as you can, even if it means opening a new account:

  • Earn a bank bonus. Some banks offer a bonus if you meet specific requirements, such as depositing a minimum amount or setting up direct deposit. These bonuses can give you an incentive to try a new bank while padding your savings with a few extra hundred dollars.
  • Look beyond your local bank. If you want to earn enough interest on your savings to keep up with inflation, look beyond your local bank to the range of online banks offering much higher interest rates. For example, Chase banking customers are currently earning 0.01% on their savings, while those who save with UFB Direct are earning 5.06% APY with no monthly maintenance fees or minimum balance requirements.
  • Take advantage of new banking tools.Bankrate.com shows approximately 60% of consumers are very or somewhat interested in using a digital bank in the coming year. This is partly due to the digitization of nearly all other aspects of our lives, but it’s also due to convenient online tools like mobile check deposit, virtual account management and bill pay features.
  • Watch out for fees. Take note that many of the best bank accounts with great rates don’t charge monthly maintenance fees or any hidden fees. However, you’ll want to read over the fine print for accounts you’re considering so you know for sure. This is especially true with CD’s at some banks that tease with high interest rates, but hide the 1% to 3% penalties of your balance for early withdrawal.
  • Stability is important. When making a banking move, double check to ensure your deposits are FDIC insured. But even if insured, you still should check the press for any indication of deposit risk at your chosen bank. And if your current bank is still offering low interest rates, it may be subject to deposit flight limits that may create difficulty removing your funds. So while your money is insured, it may be hard to withdraw should this happen.

Today’s interest rates can be a boon for your finances, but you’ll need to put in some work up front to find the best bank for your particular situation. Shop around for a new bank and look for ways to get ahead, either through banking bonuses, great rates or both. The time and effort you spend will be worth it in the end!

Mitigating Business Risk with Cross-Training

Mitigating Business Risk with Cross-Training

Cross-training to ensure more than one person knows key functional areas can be a win-win situation for you and your employees. Large companies often use it to prepare managers for future promotions. But in small companies, cross-training can be a great way to mitigate risk.

How you implement cross-training will depend on the size and nature of your business. Consider prioritizing the departments that need and/or want cross-training the most. These departments may be understaffed or have many new employees. Look for important functions that are currently dependent on a single person’s knowledge. These areas should be a focus of your cross-training program.

As you implement a cross-training program, here are a few tips to help you along the way:

  • Document your key processes. You cannot cross-train if you don’t know the process. These written processes will turn into training documents as you implement your program. So your first step is identifying key processes and procedures and having your current people that are doing these functions to get them down on paper or documented through short videos.
  • Communicate to your team. Get everyone in step before starting a cross-training program. Help your team understand why the company is cross-training your team. Reasons may be to prepare for organizational growth or new industry standards, to cover functions when someone is on vacation, or to adjust to a changing structure that’s focused around roles and responsibilities. Then continue to communicate with your team throughout the process with status updates and next steps.
  • Present cross-training as an opportunity. Your employees may be more resistant to cross-training if it feels like it’s an obligation or a threat to their roles. You can help them feel motivated by highlighting the benefits, like developing different skill sets and having a better understanding of how their contributions positively impact other parts of the business.
  • Start with a small pilot program. Test the waters with a select group of employees to get a better understanding of what works and what needs to be tweaked. You can then expand the program later as you gain insight and experience.
  • Determine cross-training hours. Figure out how much time can be dedicated to cross-training for each team to still run efficiently. This may include setting aside a few hours each day, or setting aside full days for a certain period of time to focus on cross-training. If your business is seasonal, ramp up cross-training during your low seasonal period.
  • Listen to feedback. You may learn that some employees have already started cross-training on their own. You can use this kind of valuable feedback to fine-tune your official cross-training program.

Keep in mind that some employees may resist having to train others, and productivity may suffer in the short-term. But remember the cost of not cross-training – if you lose a key employee and no one else knows how to do their tasks, your business may have trouble finding a replacement.

Year-End Tax Planning Tips for Your Business

Year-End Tax Planning Tips for Your Business

As 2023 winds down, here are some ideas to help you prepare for filing your upcoming tax return:

  • Informational returns. Identify all vendors who require a 1099-MISC and a 1099-NEC. Obtain tax identification numbers (TINs) for each of these vendors if you have not already done so.
  • Shifting income and expenses. Consider accelerating income, or deferring earnings, based on profit projections.
  • Be prepared to receive a Form 1099-K. You may receive a Form 1099-K from each payment processor from whom you receive $600 or more in payments. In addition to credit card companies and banks, payment processors can include Amazon, Etsy, PayPal, Venmo and Apple Pay. You’ll need to include the 1099-K on your tax return.
  • Categorize income and expenses. The best way to prepare for receiving a 1099-K is to organize your records by major categories of income, expenses and fixed asset purchases. If your accounting records are accurate, then any tax form, including a 1099-K, should be easy to tie out to your books.
  • Separation of expenses. Review business accounts to ensure personal expenses are not present. Reimburse the business for any expenses discovered during this review.
  • Create expense reports. Having expense reports with supporting invoices and business credit card statements with corresponding invoices will help substantiate your deductions in the event of an audit.
  • Fixed asset planning. Section 179 or bonus depreciation expensing versus traditional depreciation is a great planning tool. If using Section 179, the qualified assets must be placed in service prior to year-end.
  • Leveraging business meals. Business meals with clients or customers are 50% deductible. Retain the necessary receipts and documentation that note when the meal took place, who attended and the business purpose on each receipt.
  • Charitable opportunities. Consider any last-minute deductible charitable giving including long-term capital gain stocks.
  • Cell phone record review. Review your telephone records for qualified business use. While expensing a single landline out of a home office can be difficult to deduct, cell phone use can be documented and deducted for business purposes.
  • Inventory review. Review your inventory for proper counts and remove obsolete or worthless products. Keep track of the obsolete and worthless amounts for a potential deduction.
  • Review your receivables. Focus on collection activities and review your uncollectible accounts for possible write-offs.
  • Review your estimated tax payments. Recap your year-to-date estimated tax payments and compare them to your forecast of full year earnings. Then make your 2023 4th quarter estimated tax payment by January 16, 2024.
Your Home is a Bundle of Tax Benefits

Your Home is a Bundle of Tax Benefits

There are many tax benefits built into home ownership. Here is a review of the most common.

  • The home gain exclusion. When you sell an asset for a profit, it creates a taxable event. If the asset, though, is your primary residence, you can exclude up to $250,000 ($500,000 if married filing jointly) of these gains. Special rules do apply, but this is a major tax benefit of home ownership.

    How to take advantage: You must live in your house for at least 2 of the previous 5 years to qualify for the home gain exclusion. Start planning now if you think you’ll be selling your house in the near future so you can qualify for this tax break.
  • Itemized deductions. Mortgage interest and property taxes are two deductions you can claim as a homeowner. The interest is deductible on the first $750,000 associated with loans secured by your primary and secondary residences ($1 million for mortgages underwritten prior to 2018), while up to $10,000 of property taxes may be deducted. You may also deduct points paid as an itemized deduction over the life of your mortgage.

    How to take advantage: You need to itemize your deductions to take advantage of these tax breaks. Consider bunching your mortgage interest and property taxes with other itemized deductions such as charitable contributions, taxes and excess medical expenses to try and exceed the standard deduction for your filing status.
  • Free rental income. You can rent out your home for up to two weeks and not claim the income. While you cannot deduct expenses in this scenario, this is a great tax break if your home is located next to a popular landmark or a major event.

    How to take advantage: Keep track of how many days you rent out your home so you don’t go over the 14-day limit. If you rent your house for just 15 days over a given year instead of 14, you’ll owe taxes on all rental income for that year, including the first 14 days.
  • Home office deduction. If you use a portion of your house exclusively as a home office, you may be able to deduct certain expenses such as mortgage interest, insurance, utilities, & repairs.

    How to take advantage: To qualify for the deduction, you generally must use this portion of your house exclusively for business purposes on a regular basis. So be sure to understand the limitations of this deduction.

Your house is a great place to control the amount of tax you owe, but only if you know the rules and can apply these rules to your situation. Use this information as a starting point to see if there are ways to leverage your home’s tax benefits.

Have Fun With This Year’s Holiday Quiz!

Have Fun With This Year’s Holiday Quiz!

Back by popular demand is this season’s holiday movie and TV trivia quiz! So while you’re waiting for your holiday dinner or just resting after a wonderful feast, break out this quiz to share with family and friends. Enjoy!

  • The song White Christmas, performed by Bing Crosby, was sung in a number of movies. In which movie did the song make its debut?
  • Holiday Inn. The song White Christmas was released in 1942 as part of the movie Holiday Inn. Many think that the song debuted in the movie titled with the same name. While extremely popular, the movie White Christmas was created in part to leverage the popularity of the song.

    Bonus: Who won an Oscar for writing White Christmas?
    A: Irving Berlin
  • In the movie It’s a Wonderful Life, what happens every time a bell rings?
  • An angel gets it’s wings…

    Bonus: What was the name of the angel?
    A: Clarence
  • In the movie Home Alone, the family is going on vacation and accidentally leaves Kevin behind. Where were they going?
  • Paris

    Bonus: Give yourself a point if you can name either of the thieves in the movie.
    A. Harry (Joe Pesci) and Marv (Daniel Stern)
  • In the movie How the Grinch Stole Christmas, what three words are used to describe the Grinch?
  • Stink, Stank, Stunk

    Bonus: Who voiced the Grinch in the famous cartoon?
    A: Boris Karloff, who appeared in 174 films and is known for his role as the original Frankenstein, won a Grammy award for portraying the Grinch and narrating How the Grinch Stole Christmas.
  • Tom Hanks played six different roles in this popular holiday movie.
  • The Polar Express

    Bonus: The Polar Express had a number of firsts. Name any one of them for a bonus point.
    • First full-length animated movie released in IMAX format.
    • First full-length movie to use animated 3D capture technology allowing creation without drawing each individual frame.
    • First movie to be released with a Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack.
    • First animated movie to have a song nominated for an Academy Award. The song was titled Believe.
  • In the movie A Charlie Brown Christmas, what does Charlie Brown do poorly that turns out all right in the end?
  • He buys a sad-looking tree. But in the end everyone gets the Christmas spirit and wishes Charlie Brown a Merry Christmas. Linus sums up the feeling: I never thought it was such a bad little tree. It’s not bad at all, really. Maybe it just needs a little love.

    Bonus: Name the comic strip made famous by Charlie Brown and its creator Charles Schulz.
    A. Peanuts

May you and yours enjoy the holiday season with peace and joy.

Results:

11 to 12 points: Deck the Halls! You are awesome.

8 to 10 points: You are dashing through the snow…no walking for you!

4 to 7 points: Ho! Ho! Ho! You are having fun besides watching holiday movies.

0 to 3 points: Holidays? What Holidays? Pass me a cookie, would you please?

 

Year-End Tax Planning Tips for Your Business

Year-End Tax Planning Tips for Your Business

As 2023 winds down, here are some ideas to help you prepare for filing your upcoming tax return:

  • Informational returns. Identify all vendors who require a 1099-MISC and a 1099-NEC. Obtain tax identification numbers (TINs) for each of these vendors if you have not already done so.
  • Shifting income and expenses. Consider accelerating income, or deferring earnings, based on profit projections.
  • Be prepared to receive a Form 1099-K. You may receive a Form 1099-K from each payment processor from whom you receive $600 or more in payments. In addition to credit card companies and banks, payment processors can include Amazon, Etsy, PayPal, Venmo and Apple Pay. You’ll need to include the 1099-K on your tax return.
  • Categorize income and expenses. The best way to prepare for receiving a 1099-K is to organize your records by major categories of income, expenses and fixed asset purchases. If your accounting records are accurate, then any tax form, including a 1099-K, should be easy to tie out to your books.
  • Separation of expenses. Review business accounts to ensure personal expenses are not present. Reimburse the business for any expenses discovered during this review.
  • Create expense reports. Having expense reports with supporting invoices and business credit card statements with corresponding invoices will help substantiate your deductions in the event of an audit.
  • Fixed asset planning. Section 179 or bonus depreciation expensing versus traditional depreciation is a great planning tool. If using Section 179, the qualified assets must be placed in service prior to year-end.
  • Leveraging business meals. Business meals with clients or customers are 50% deductible. Retain the necessary receipts and documentation that note when the meal took place, who attended and the business purpose on each receipt.
  • Charitable opportunities. Consider any last-minute deductible charitable giving including long-term capital gain stocks.
  • Cell phone record review. Review your telephone records for qualified business use. While expensing a single landline out of a home office can be difficult to deduct, cell phone use can be documented and deducted for business purposes.
  • Inventory review. Review your inventory for proper counts and remove obsolete or worthless products. Keep track of the obsolete and worthless amounts for a potential deduction.
  • Review your receivables. Focus on collection activities and review your uncollectible accounts for possible write-offs.
  • Review your estimated tax payments. Recap your year-to-date estimated tax payments and compare them to your forecast of full year earnings. Then make your 2023 4th quarter estimated tax payment by January 16, 2024.
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